Take a Regular Learning Vacation

For the past three months, I’ve focused on one thing – learning JavaScript. I put aside all freelance work and committed to at least 30 minutes per day. I called it my “learning vacation”. I might have started at (just above) ground zero knowledge-wise, but by golly, I was going to make some progress.

How did I do? I completed the Treehouse Front End Web Development course, which covered JavaScript and jQuery. I hacked away on a GitHub project and managed to get everything working (still some improvements I want to make). I’m not ready to lead a development team, but I have a better idea of how JavaScript works and can fumble my way around a project.

There were some frustrating nights and mornings spent staring at a computer screen hoping an answer would pop out at me. I read more StackOverflow threads than I would care to admit, and my Google searches grew more and more desperate. I wanted to quit more than a handful of times.

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Closing The Expert Gap

Since it’s just you and me here, I’ll admit a secret: I really hate being terrible at something.

When I try to pick-up a new skill, I take a look around at people that have been doing that “thing” for years, and I immediately want to be on their level. I want the instant gratification of being excellent instead of slogging through years of being terrible.

For the better part of the past three months, I’ve focused all of my free time on one thing – learning front-end web development, specifically JavaScript. I enrolled in a front-end course on Treehouse. I subbed out fiction before bed for Eloquent JavaScript so I could dream in for loops and if statements.I stopped writing blog posts and told all of my freelance clients I was busy.

Here we are at the end of three months of full immersion and guess what? I’m nowhere near where I thought I would be.

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